Gaiseric

The Battle of Isonzo. August 28, 489 AD.

In 476, the barbarian warlord Odoacer foundered the Kingdom of Italy as the first King of Italy, initiating a new era over Roman lands. Unlike most of the last emperors, he acted decisively. At the beginning of his reign he “slew Count Bracila at Ravenna that he might inspire a fear of himself among the Romans.” He took many military actions to strengthen his control over Italy and its neighboring areas. He achieved a solid diplomatic coup by inducing the Vandal king Gaiseric to cede to him Sicily. Noting that “Odovacar seized power in August of 476, Gaiseric died in January 477, and the sea usually became closed to navigation around the beginning of November”, F.M. Clover dates this cession to September or October 476. When Julius Nepos was murdered by two of his r...

Carthage Falls to the Vandals – October 24, 439 AD

Gaiseric (also spelled Genseric and Geiseric) was born in Hungary, c.389 AD, the illegitimate son of King Godigisel of the Vandals. Godigisel was slain in battle against the Franks in 406, during the Crossing of the Rhine. Upon his death, his son Gunderic took the throne. He ruled for 22 years, often clashing with the Visigoths who were much more numerous. Gaiseric was crowned king in 428, when the Vandals were settled in Hispania Baetica. This  is a category of  Carthage coins. Gaiseric had great vision and ambition, but his relatively small Germanic tribe was in constant conflict with other tribes in the area. He decided to move all 20-80,000 of his people to North Africa, which was at the time under Roman Imperial rule and leave the fighting in Hispania to the Visigoths and Suebi. It is...

The Sacking of Rome – June 16, 455 AD

The Vandals were living in the Roman province of Hispania Baetica during the reign of King Gunderic. After Gunderic’s death in 428 AD, his half-brother, Genseric (or Gaiseric), was elected king. He wanted to greatly expand the power and influence of his people, but was suffering from numerous attacks by their neighbors, the larger Visigoth tribe. After being attacked by another neighboring tribe, the Suebi, Genseric decided to move to North Africa, even though he was victorious in this battle. At the time, the Roman governor of North Africa, Bonifacius, was having disputes with Aetius, an accomplished Roman general and Master of Soldiers stationed there. By 429, Genseric had moved all of his people, between 20-80,000 of them, to the new lands and taking advantage of the Roman divided force...

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