Persian Empire

The death of Alexander. June 11, 323 BC.

Alexander III of Macedon (July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander the Great, known in ancient Iranian and Zoroastrian sources as Alexander the Accursed, was a king of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and a member of the Argead dynasty. He was born in Pella in 356 BC and succeeded his father Philip II to the throne at the age of 20. He spent most of his ruling years on an unprecedented military campaign through Asia and northeast Africa, and by the age of thirty he had created one of the largest empires of the ancient world, stretching from Greece to northwestern India. He was undefeated in battle and is widely considered one of history’s most successful military commanders. During his youth, Alexander was tutored by Aristotle until age 16. After Philip’...

The Battle of Marathon – September 12, 490 BC.

  The Battle of Marathon defined the end of the first of the Greco-Persian Wars. The battle took place in the bay near the town of Marathon, not far from Athens, in the Attica coast. On one side, the Persian king Darius I wanted to invade and conquer Athens for supporting the cities of Ionia in their attempt to bring down Persian rule. On the other side, Athenians and their allies, the Plataeans. It was in this battle where Philippedes ran from Athens to Sparta to ask the Spartan army for help, as the Persian army wouldn´t stop once Athens was conquered. Sparta was engaged in a religious festivity at that moment, and gave this as an excuse for not coming in Athen´s aid. After five days of fighting, the Athenian and Plataean army crushed the Persian infantry, which fled with a huge los...

Battle of Thermopylae – August 9, 480 BC

The Greek region of Ionia had been conquered by Persia around 540 BC and the city-states were ruled by Persian tyrants from then on. Darius I was a usurper, becoming the third king of the Persian Empire by overthrowing Gaumata through the assistance of six noble families, in September 522 BC. In 499 BC, the Greek city-states of Athens and Eritrea encouraged the Ionian Revolt against the Persians. The Ionians attacked and burned Sardis, and Darius responded by following them back to Ionia, defeating them in the Battle of Ephesus in 498 BC. The Persians then responded with a three-pronged attack in 497 BC, capturing the outlying areas of the rebellion. The forces stalemated in 496-495 BC when the Greeks consolidated into Caria. In 494 BC, the Persian army and navy regrouped and attacked Mile...

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