Granada

The Battle of Lepanto. October 7, 1571.

Venice had attempted to check Ottoman expansion in the eastern Mediterranean until 1540 but then, exhausted and despairing of support, made a humiliating peace with Süleyman I. His successor, Selim II, was determined to acquire the Venetian outpost of Cyprus and, when the Venetians refused to cede the island, invaded it in 1570. Venice appealed for help to Pope Pius V, who had tried since 1566 to form an alliance of Roman Catholic states. France and the Holy Roman Empire were preoccupied with the sweeping changes wrought by the Reformation. Spain offered hope, but Philip II, with an empty treasury, was faced with revolts in Andalusia and the Netherlands. Venice also deeply distrusted Spanish influence in Italy. Pius, however, was committed to drawing Spain, Venice, and the smaller Italian ...

February 12, 1502. The Muslim Conversion or Expulsion.

Unlike the Muslims of Granada, who were under Muslim rule until 1492, Muslims in the rest of Castile had lived under Christian rule for generations. Following the conversions in Granada, Isabella decided to impose a conversion-or-expulsion decree against the Muslims. Castile outlawed Islam in a legislation dated July 1501 in Granada, but it was not immediately made public. The proclamation took place on February 12, 1502, in Seville, and then locally in other towns. The edict affected “all kingdoms and lordships of Castile and Leon“. According to the edict, all Muslim males aged 14 or more, or females aged 12 or more, should convert or leave Castile by the end of April 1502. The edict justified the decision by saying that after the successful conversion of Granada, allowing Mus...

King of Granada. June 28, 1360.

Muhammed VI (1332 – 25 April 1362) was the brother in-law of Ismail II, by his marriage to one of Ismail II’s full-blood sisters, and after his murder, he was proclaimed tenth Nasrid ruler of Granada in Iberia. He was descended from the female branch of the Nasrid Dynasty through his great-grandmother Fatima, daughter of Muhammed II al-Faqih. He was known in Spanish as El Bermejo for his red hair. Moorish chroniclers described him as a coarse man in dress and manners. He aligned himself with the Christian Crown of Aragon and discarded the usual tribute of his ancestors to Castile. In January 1362 at Guadix, he took many Castilians captive after an incursion. Muhammed V had returned to Andalusia in 1361 capturing Malaga, Loja, Antequera, Velez and Alhama. Muhammed VI fled Granada in M...

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